Author Archive

The new law – with important parts highlighted

Chapter 417 of the Acts of 2004 AN ACT AUTHORIZING WATER SUBMETERING IN RESIDENTIAL TENANCIES. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: SECTION 1. Subsection (4) of section 15B of chapter 186 of the General Laws, as appearing in the [&hellip

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Negative Impacts of Water Submetering Bill [H.5001] if enacted into law

BRIEF SUMMARY: Water submetering would transfer water bills from owners to tenants through proportional billing according to actual submetered water usage. Water conservation among the tenant population could reach 25% to 30% reduction in water usage – and save taxpayers the huge costs of new water and sewage treatment plants in the future – but [&hellip

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Governor signs water submetering bill – useless to small owners, and worse yet

Water submetering bill passes Useless for small owners Worse yet:  just-cause eviction & back-door rent control On December 16, Governor Mitt Romney signed the Water Submet-ering bill into law, over the strenuous objections of SPOA, which was excluded from drafting the bill. Backing the bill, however, were the Greater Boston Real Estate Board (GBREB) and the [&hellip

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The concept of “landlord”: A short history from medieval times to the present

Written in 1951, Langston Hughes’s “Ballad of the Landlord” depicts a stereotype – the slumlord – which exaggerates the reality of landlords even for its own time half a century ago. Nevertheless, the poem refers to what was undoubtedly a far more common practice 50 years ago, so-called “self-help” evictions where landlords evict nonpaying or [&hellip

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The moral virtues of landlords

By Howard Husock Director of Case Studies, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University The following is a condensed version of Husock’s speech at SPOA’s 10th Anniversary Celebration of Question 9 last December. This organization calls its members “small property owners,” not “landlords.” But we know that tenants and the general public, whether we like it [&hellip

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